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Ganga River (गगां)  Page 1

  

Introduction
Map of Ganga
Ganga India's national river
Source of Ganga River
Ganga River in plains
Tributaries of the Ganga River
Pollution in Ganga River
Ganga action plan
Ganga & climate change
History
Ganga in Hindu religion
Khumb Mela
Economy
Tehri dam
Ecology
Ganga River Rafting
References

  Introduction

  The Ganga (गगां) river or Ganges is India's national river and a major river of the Indian subcontinent rising in the Himalaya Mountains and flowing about 2,510 km generally eastward through a vast plain to the Bay of Bengal. On its 1,560-mi (2,510-km) course, it flows southeast through the Indian states of Uttarakhand, Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, and West Bengal.

  In West Bengal it is joined by the Brahmaputra River and Meghna rivers combined waters (called the Padma River) empty into the Bay of Bengal and form a Sundarbans the world largest delta.

  Ganges plain is one of the most fertile and densely populated regions in the world. The Ganges alone drains an area of over a million square km with a population of over 407 million. Millions depend on water for drinking, bathing, agriculture, industry and other uses.

     Ganga river


  Ganga river is Mother Ganges for Hindus and  revered as a goddess whose purity cleanses the sins of the faithful . In most Hindu families, a vial of water from the Ganga is kept in every house. It is believed that drinking water from the Ganga with one's last breath will take the soul to heaven. Hindus also believe life is incomplete without bathing in the Ganga at least once in their lifetime. Some of the most important Hindu festivals and religious congregations are celebrated on the banks of the river Ganga such as the Kumbh Mela or the Kumbh Mela and the Chhath Festival.

  The upper Ganges supplies water to extensive irrigation works. The river passes the holy bathing sites at Haridwar, Allahabad (where the Yamuna river enters the Ganga), and Varanasi. Below Allahabad the Ganges becomes a slow, meandering stream with shifting channels. Because of its location near major population centers, however, the river is highly polluted. The Ganga collects large amounts of human pollutants as it flows through highly populous areas. These populous areas, and other people down stream, are then exposed to these potentially hazardous accumulations. On August 13, 2014 SC asks Centre to give roadmap for cleaning Ganga in two weeks

On line Source of Ganga map

 Sundarbans the world largest delta

National Ganga River Basin Authority (NGRBA)

River Ganga will be free from most of its pollution within three years

Ganga water carries poisonous chemicals

  Map of Ganga

     Map of Ganga river

  The map of Ganga river from Gangotri to Bay of Bengal

  Ganga Indias national river

   The mighty Ganga is not only the river but much more to the millions for whom the Ganga is a symbol of faith, hope, substance and sanity. The Ex. Prime Minister Manmohan Singh declared on November 4, 2008 that henceforth the Ganga would be known as 'national river' of India. 

  Manmohan Singh has also announced   to set up a separate high powered Ganga River Basin Authority to stop its pollution and degradation. Chaired by the Prime minister, the National Ganga River Basin Authority (NGRBA) would have as the members the chief ministers of states through which the river flows, besides working closely with ministers of water resources, environment and forests, urban development and others as well as agencies working on  river conservation and pollution management.

   On April 28, 2011 the Cabinet Committee on Economic Affairs has approved the Project for cleaning of River Ganga to be implemented by the National Ganga River Basin Authority (NGRBA) at an estimated cost of Rs. 7000 crore. The share of Government of India will be Rs 5100 crore and the State Governments of Uttarakhand, Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Jharkhand and WB will be Rs 1900 crore. On July 11, 2014 Ganga clean up project gets Rs2,037 crore in Union Budget 2014.

Source of Ganga River

 In the Uttarakhand Himalayas where glacial water flowing from a cave at Gaumukh, is the origin of the Bhagirathi river. Gaumukh has been described as a desolate place at an altitude of about 4,000 meters (13,000 feet). Twenty-three kilometers from Gaumukh, the river reaches Gangotri, the first town on its path.

  The river which joins the Alaknanda river at Devaprayag, also in the Uttarakhand Himalayas, to form the Ganga. The Ganga then flows through the Himalayan valleys and emerges into the north Indian plain at the town of Haridwar.

   Recent pictures taken by Google Earth via satellite have confirmed that an eight-km stretch of the Bhagirathi river has dried up. The river is shown snaking through the Himalayan mountains as one long, sandy stretch minus any water. Other rivers emanating from the Gangotri glacier, including the Bhilangana, the Assi Ganga and the Alaknanda, all tributaries of the Ganga river, are drying up.

 Since the river Ganga (Bhagirathi) is still emanating from the ice cave (Gaumukh) of Gangotri Glacier, no steps are required to be taken at present for bringing back the flow of river Ganga. As far as the recession of the glacier is concerned it is a part of natural phenomena and cannot be stopped by using short term artificial measures.

 September 30, 2014: PM urged Indian American community to help cleaning of the Ganga

Ganga River News

Govt asks 48 industrial units polluting River Ganga to close down

 Modi assigns task of cleaning Ganga to Uma Bharti

Ganga Aarati at Varanasi by Narendra Modi

    Gangotri

 Thousands of visitors come to Gangotri each year, from every part of the world. Gangotri  is situated at a height of more than 10,000 feet in Uttarkashi district, is one of the four shrines of Badrinath, Kedarnath and Yamunotri in Uttrakhand commonly called Himalayan Char Dham .

  Swami Nigamanand

  A new rishi to save the Ganga

Ganga prisoner of power projects

 

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